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Rise of the SHE shed

SheShed

the SHE shed – Is this the ultimate sanctuary?

Rise of the SHE shed, as more women demand an oasis of calm at the bottom of the garden away from the chaos of family life.

For years, the garden shed has been the domain of the man, but now women are demanding their own huts at the bottom of the garden. They come in an array of styles including beach huts and Tudor cottages

For decades, sheds have a been a place that men build at the bottom of the garden so they have a place to be alone. 

In the book ‘Men and Sheds,’ the author Gordon Thorburn called the wooden buildings a “male necessity” – somewhere were they could do some woodwork, pot some plants or even just read the newspaper in peace.

But now the female sex and demanding a place at the bottom of the garden to call their own – a she shed.

Rise of the SHE shed - The Gothic Retreat Shed from Wolverhampton

The Gothic Retreat Shed from Wolverhampton

More and more women are demanding their own ‘she sheds’, places at the bottom of the garden they can call their own.

As everyday life gets every more stressful and homes get smaller, women are also looking to the single-storey structures as a safe haven.

But while most men might be content with a leaky old shack made of rotting timber, female customers are looking for a home away from home.

They are commissioning sheds in a range of styles from beach huts and gypsy caravans to mock Tudor pavilions with tiled floors.

Instead of a few upturned apple boxes and an old wireless, the new she sheds are being decked out with Moroccan rugs, cushions, chandeliers and coffee tables.

Some have gone one step further and installed a diner in theirs, complete with working jukebox and fifties-style restaurant booths.

Fancy a ‘she shed’ of your own? Read on for some inspiration…

Seaside Shed - Beach Hut

The owner of this shed has taken inspiration from the seaside, creating a beach hut-type style

 

Extremely Spacious Hut

This ‘she shed’ is extremely spacious and could entertain a number of people without feeling cramped

 

This shed owner has added numerous grand touches to their abode, including ornamental lions, ornate curtains and a candelabra 

This shed owner has added numerous grand touches to their abode, including ornamental lions, ornate curtains and a candelabra

 

Gypsy-style Caravan

This quaint gypsy-style caravan has gone for the light and airy touch, with some bright furnishings inside

 

Renne and Alberts Shed from the Sutton

Renne and Alberts Shed from the Sutton, a finalist in the normal category of the 2014 Shed of the Year competition sponsored by Cuprinol. The shed has been selected from over 2,000 entries by more than 20,000 public votes. The winner will be announced during Channel 4’s Amazing Spaces: Shed of the Year series. To be aired over three episodes, starting on 24th July at 8pm. As well as the prestigious title, the winner will receive £1,000 courtesy of sponsors Cuprinol and a commemorative winners wooden plaque for their shed.

With a jukebox, fridge, popcorn maker and bar… the owner of this shed never needs to go back into their main home.

 

Olde English Garden Shed

This she shed owner has gone for the Olde English Garden touch with their thatched rood and Union Jack bunting.

 

This pagoda-style shed has taken inspiration from The Orient

This pagoda-style shed has taken inspiration from The Orient.

 

kooky garden shed

This kooky garden shed appears to have taken inspiration from Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.

 

This shed has more soft furnishings in it than a lot of living rooms in proper houses 

This shed has more soft furnishings in it than a lot of living rooms in proper houses.

 

This shed has brought a splash of Arabian colour to an English back garden 

This shed has brought a splash of Arabian colour to an English back garden.

 

Read the original article on the Rise of the SHE shed

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Telegraph Christmas Garden Sheds

Telegraph Christmas Garden Sheds

In the ‘Gardening Picture Galleries’ lies the ‘Christmas gift guide: the ultimate garden sheds’. Telegraph Christmas Garden Sheds, Our own Solar Potting Shed features on image 9 with the following Description;

Growzone

Raise seedlings as well as store tools securely in this solar potting shed, which has a workbench below the wall of windows and a stable door for ventilation.

The Telegraph – Christmas gift guide: the ultimate garden sheds

Solar Potting Shed 7 x 5

Buy a Solar Potting Shed this Christmas, perfect for any garden.  Enjoy the comforts of a nice warm potting shed, prepare you seedlings for the beginning of the year and give them a start they need.

View Our Range of Potting Sheds at Titan

Solar Potting Shed 10 x 6

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mens sheds movement

Mens Sheds

‘If I didn’t come to the shed, I’d be alone, watching TV’

Men’s Sheds, a communal woodworking project that started in Australia, has taken off in the UK and is helping men to combat isolation and loneliness.

 

Les Leahy in the Camden Town Shed with Mike Jenn, who suggests men tend not to recognise their need for social interaction. Photograph: Graham Turner for the Guardian

“I thought I was too old for this,” says Les Leahy, 87, as he brandishes a half finished table lamp and a toolbox. “When I first came here, I hadn’t touched my tools in 25 years. I thought I couldn’t use them anymore – I was planning to throw them all away.”

A retired woodwork teacher, Leahy is part of a growing project to improve the mental health of older men through a simple solution: sheds. Three months ago, Les joined a local group in Camden, north London, who meet to mend and create woodwork in a communal space.

Men’s Sheds first started in Australia in 2006 to provide support to men who have experienced mental health issues, problems with the transition to retirement or a lack of social interaction. There are now more than 1,200 sheds in Australia and the scheme has gone global. On Friday, leaders from Australia, Ireland and the UK will gather in Havant, Hampshire, to discuss and celebrate the growth of Men’s Sheds across Britain. A shed is opening every week; there are now more than 100; three in Havant alone.

The first thing I notice about the shed in Camden is that it is not a shed. Yet it certainly looks – and sounds – like one. Tucked away inside a community centre, I hear the saws before I see them. Under low ceilings, planks of wood, reels of tape and tiny plastic boxes full of screws sit surrounded by red wood shavings and half-sanded fruit bowls; evidence of the week’s work. Saws 3ft long hang on cupboard doors and hidden under the worktable are boxes of finished goods: plates, bowls, candlesticks, jigsaw puzzles and “bee hotels” ready for winter. On the walls hang pictures of the group’s communal projects: bird boxes, a gate for the local park and a wooden castle for children at a nearby archery club.

Mike Jenn is carving a sculpture in tribute to The Scream, a painting by Edvard Munch. Jenn is chair of both the UK Men’s Sheds Association and the Camden Town Shed, which he started in 2011 after retiring from a career in the voluntary sector. Although the first Men’s Sheds were launched here by Age UK, Jenn’s project was the first to be led by the community.

“I saw there was a social need and I wanted to demonstrate you could do something about it without money,” says Jenn. The Camden shed costs £5,000 a year to run and is 95% self-sufficient, funded by members’ donations, product sales and by running training for the local community. Almost all of the wood and tools are either scrap that has been found or donated by closing businesses and local people.

“At the beginning, when we needed tools, all it took was four lines in the Camden New Journal. We received six car loads – almost all of it from widows, who wanted their husband’s tools to ‘go to a good home’.”

Jenn thinks the 20 or so people who use the shed, which is open two days a week, roughly fit into two groups – those who come on occasion to get a job done, and those who come regularly for the interaction. He remembers one member who came after experiencing suicidal thoughts.

“He was 54, he couldn’t find a job and his benefits had been cut; he was losing weight. When he came along he just talked and talked and talked – he didn’t do much mending of anything! After eight weeks, he told one of the men who used to be a GP how bad things had become,” remembers Jenn.

According to a 014 survey by Age UK, more than one million people over 65 in the UK are often or always lonely, an increase of 38% on the previous year. Two-fifths of respondents said that their main form of company is the television.

The project in north London is open to women one day a week, but only one woman comes regularly. Jenn believes that men are less likely to recognise their need for social interaction and are less well provided for by the community sector.

“The offer is wrong and made in the wrong way,” he says. “Men are programmed to believe they can look after themselves. They don’t directly see that their life could be enriched by being with others so they end up hiding away watching TV. If you want a man to do something, don’t ask him to volunteer, tell him there is a problem and it needs fixing.”

Ray Caplan first came to the shed after he was struck by lightning on a golf course six years ago, an accident that forced him to retire from his career as a dentist. He still struggles with his memory but says it is improving. He says he comes for the simple reason that it “is something to do; something to think about”.

Leahy is the oldest member of the group. He lives on his own and has no children. He tries to see his niece once a fortnight. Although adamant that he “absolutely does not believe in the good old days”, Leahy is convinced that people now interact less with their neighbours than they used to. “Forty years ago I knew everyone on my street. Now I don’t know any of the people in my block.”

The UK is among the most socially isolated countries in Europe, according to research published in June 2014 by the Office for National Statistics. Asked whether they feel close to people in their local area, 42% said they did not – the highest proportion after Germany.

Jenn nods: “There has been a huge trend in society in recent decades towards individualism – it’s the result of affluence and commercialisation. Companies want us to live in one-bedroom flats, with our own washing machines and computers. We are boxing off people and sticking them in open plan offices to stare at screens. On the factory floors there was banter, there was interaction. That’s what the men miss here.”

The Campaign to End Loneliness, a national network set up in 2011, believes the issue is a “public health disaster” waiting to happen.Scientific research shows that for older people, loneliness is twice as unhealthy as obesity, as it is linked to high blood pressure, strokes and a weakened immune system.

Laura Ferguson, the director of the campaign, says: “This needs to be a top priority for every local health and care service. We need national leadership and investment on this issue or we may end up pushing already stretched services to breaking point.”

With two hearing aids, Leahy struggles to hear me, but it is obvious he is happy just to talk. “If I didn’t come here I would just be sat at home watching the TV on my own. But here, I have made friends.”

Full credit and more on the article including more images from the The Guardian

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No Husbands Allowed!

No Husbands Allowed

Think sheds are only a refuge for men? These women built their own backyard havens

Crafty way to escape

Caroline Counsell, 42, is a sales assistant who lives in Redhill, Surrey, with husband Darren, 45, a mechanic, and their two sons. The shed is my escape from a house in which I am outnumbered by men. I love arts and crafts, so I spend hours with scraps of fabric and ribbon, making cards and bunting for friends and family as gifts.  It’s 8ft by 10ft and is filled with colourful containers and piled with knick-knacks. I have a desk, chair and computer — and I painted fluffy white clouds on the ceiling. Though the shed is my corner of girliness, there is one male who is allowed over the threshold, though — my Jack Russell, Mylo!

Outnumbered by men: Caroline Counsell gfrom Redhill, Surrey, uses her garden retreat to indulge in her love for arts and crafts and have a break from her husband and two sons

Outnumbered by men: Caroline Counsell gfrom Redhill, Surrey, uses her garden retreat to indulge in her love for arts and crafts and have a break from her husband and two sons

OrganisedThe 8ft by 10ft tent is filled with colourful containers and piled with knick-knacks. There is a desk, chair and computer ¿ and painted fluffy white clouds on the ceiling

OrganisedThe 8ft by 10ft tent is filled with colourful containers and piled with knick-knacks. There is a desk, chair and computer ¿ and painted fluffy white clouds on the ceiling

Sewing serenity

Manjit Sidhu, 37, a police officer, lives in Solihull with her 16-year-old daughter. Not many sheds have multi-coloured chandeliers, rose print wallpaper and a lime-green printed armchair by the French windows, but I wanted mine to be special.  I built it two years ago, and I had no idea how big a part of my life it would become. When I need to forget work, I pop down to my little sewing shed, which is pistachio green and sits under a cherry tree strewn with lanterns — it’s absolutely beautiful. I spent £5,000, but it’s worth every penny. I’m part of a sewing club and the ‘she-shed’ came into being when I ran out of space in the house for my sewing materials. Sometimes my daughter sits with me to chat or work on her own craft projects. The shed is where we have spent some of our happiest times.

No Husbands Allowed

Quaint: Manjit Sidhu, 37, a police officer, lives in Solihull with her 16-year-old daughter. She uses her ‘she’ shed when she needs to forget about work

Storage: She spent £5,000 on building the tent when she ran out of room in her house for her sewing equipment

Storage: She spent £5,000 on building the tent when she ran out of room in her house for her sewing equipment

My stained glass glory

Tatiana Hardisty,  an English teacher, lives with her retired husband John, 65, in Newcastle. My shed was a labour of love — John, who makes stained glass windows, slaved over it for months and did everything. He fitted it with panes designed to resemble the art nouveau windows of the main thoroughfare in St Petersburg, Russia, where I grew up. The roof is made from green, yellow and brown tiles that John broke up and pieced together in a mosaic — inspired by architect Antoni Gaudi’s designs in Barcelona. The effect is stunning. He did the same with shiny white tiles on the inside: it means the roof keeps the shed very warm — like a big duvet cover. He built the main frame from old bricks and broken-up concrete blocks and the lighting is built into the walls with a dimmer switch for change of mood. I filled it with matching wicker furniture and I enjoy inviting my friends around for a cup of tea and a gossip. John has his own workshop, of course, so now we’re both in the garden in sheds of our own.

Inspiration: Tatiana Hardisty, an English teacher, fitted panes designed to resemble the art nouveau windows of the main thoroughfare in St Petersburg, Russia, where she grew up

Inspiration: Tatiana Hardisty, an English teacher, fitted panes designed to resemble the art nouveau windows of the main thoroughfare in St Petersburg, Russia, where she grew up

Host: Her husband built the shed while Mrs Hardisty filled it with matching wicker furniture. She enjoys inviting her friends around for a cup of tea and a gossip

Host: Her husband built the shed while Mrs Hardisty filled it with matching wicker furniture. She enjoys inviting her friends around for a cup of tea and a gossip

Fifties tribute to mum and dad

Ann Bate, 46, lives in St Helens, Merseyside, with her husband Ian, 48. They own a launderette and have two adult daughters. My parents loved the Fifties, and three years ago I decided to buy and decorate this shed in  tribute to them. I miss my late parents desperately and creating the perfect Fifties diner has made me feel still close to them. I know they would have loved it. I’ve spent £10,000 on it, including buying a working jukebox, popcorn maker, retro fridge, original Fifties radio, phone and light-up petrol pump, which was used at Silverstone race course. We had the inside of the shed plastered and insulated so it stays warm in the winter and cool in the summer, and bright spotlights  fitted to the outside and inside. I’ve also had a special plaque made with my parents’ names on it, which I’ve hung above the door. I find most of the things for the shed at old car boot sales and I’ve been given bits and pieces by friends, who think the Fifties-themed parties I throw there are brilliant (though our neighbours don’t tend to agree). We had one recently where everyone came dressed up as teddy boys, Buddy Holly or characters from Grease. If my parents could have seen us, they would have smiled.

Ann Bate, 46, lives in St Helens, Merseyside, with her husband Ian, 48. She spent £10,000 on her 'she' shed, which is a tribute to her late parents who loved the Fifties 
 

Ann Bate, 46, lives in St Helens, Merseyside, with her husband Ian, 48. She spent £10,000 on her ‘she’ shed, which is a tribute to her late parents who loved the Fifties

Diner: The mother-of-two bought a working jukebox, popcorn maker, retro fridge, original Fifties radio, phone and light-up petrol pump, which was used at Silverstone race course

Diner: The mother-of-two bought a working jukebox, popcorn maker, retro fridge, original Fifties radio, phone and light-up petrol pump, which was used at Silverstone race course

A sweet shop good enough to eat

Belinda Brown, 43, lives with husband Andrew, 47, and their two children in Epsom, Surrey, where she runs a business from home. When we moved into our house ten years ago, the shed at the end of the garden was rather ramshackle. I had always wanted to turn it into something special, but it was only a couple of years ago that it became my duck egg blue ‘girl’s pad’. You won’t find any filthy trowels. Instead there are cushions, strawberry-print curtains, bunting and fairy lights. The children decided to call it the Sweet Shop — not because it’s full of toffees and bonbons, but because it looks good enough to eat. The shed has helped me to build my own business, making replica wooden blue plaques, like the ones you see on historic buildings. I wanted one for my shed, but couldn’t find anything suitable so made my own and it’s gone from there. I’m down here most days, making plaques or having a potter around. And  I can keep an eye on the children playing in the garden.

Treat: Belinda Brown, 43, from Epsom, Surrey, turned the ramshackle shed at the bottom of their garden into a my duck egg blue 'girl's pad'

Treat: Belinda Brown, 43, from Epsom, Surrey, turned the ramshackle shed at the bottom of their garden into a my duck egg blue ‘girl’s pad’

Decorations: There are cushions, strawberry-print curtains, bunting and fairy lights. Her children decided to call it the Sweet Shop - not because it's full of toffees and bonbons, but because it looks good enough to eat

Decorations: There are cushions, strawberry-print curtains, bunting and fairy lights. Her children decided to call it the Sweet Shop – not because it’s full of toffees and bonbons, but because it looks good enough to eat

It’s a seaside sanctuary

Lindsay Bowring Coombe, 49, an NHS worker, lives  in Bredhurst, Kent, with husband Steve, 53. I sit in my shed in my striped armchair and transport myself back to idyllic childhood seaside holidays.  We’ve always had sheds in our back garden. A few years ago, I decided to make one of my own. I sent out Steve to buy some subtle duck egg blue stain for the outer walls and he came back with an eye-watering Hawaiian blue. Luckily, I got used to it. It’s only 4ft by 6ft, but I have everything I need, including original watercolours.  I even have a ‘sounds of the sea’ CD, which I play on a portable player. I’m writing my first book and love nothing better than sitting in my armchair with my laptop and our two cats curled up next to me.  I’ve called it the Happy Days beach hut, after one I remember from childhood — and because sitting in it makes me so happy.

Lindsay Bowring Coombe, 49who lives in Bredhurst, Kent, sits in the striped armchair inside her 'she' shed and transports herself back to to idyllic childhood seaside holidays

Lindsay Bowring Coombe, 49who lives in Bredhurst, Kent, sits in the striped armchair inside her ‘she’ shed and transports herself back to to idyllic childhood seaside holidays

Full credit and more on the article including more images from the DailyMail

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Ed and Cheryl from Guildford Surrey

8x6 Challenger Metro Shed

Ed and Cheryl from Guildford, Surrey

Installation of 8 x 6 Challenger Metro Shed.

I really appreciate you being able to supply us with a shed at such short notice before our baby was due. It has enabled us to empty our spare room to turn it into a room for out toddler before the baby was born.
The shed is very well constructed and we are very pleased.

Ed and Cheryl

 

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Mr and Mrs B Chandler from Esher Surrey

8x6 Challenger Metro Shed

Mr and Mrs B Chandler from Esher, Surrey

Installation of 7 x 5 Challenger Metro Shed with load bearing shelves.

We would like to say how delighted we are with the Challenger Metro Shed recently installed at property.

What a pleasure it has been to deal with efficient, professional  ant yet friendly people from the initial inquiry through to the installation.

Please convey our special thanks to Gary who did the actual installation.  He was extremely courteous and helpful and a pleasure to deal with.

We shall not hesitate to recommend your Company to others.

Thank you again for all your help.

Yours sincerely

Mr and Mrs B Chandler

 

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Mrs Bailey from Guildford Surrey

8x6 Challenger Metro Shed

Mrs Bailey from Guildford, Surrey

Installation of 8 x 6 Challenger Metro Shed.

My son and I ordered a Metro Shed from you, and it was delivered on Wednesday 23 October. The gentleman arrived promptly at 8 am, and proceeded work immediately.

He did an excellent job and I will have no hesitation in recommending him and the Shed Factory to anyone who may need your services.

I believe it was nick who came, would you please pass on our thanks for a job well done.

Yours Faithfully.

Mrs Bailey

 

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Jane and Robert Dicken from Cobham Surrey

8x6 Challenger Metro Shed

Jane and Robert Dicken from Cobham, Surrey

Installation of 8 x 6 Challenger Metro Shed.

I would like to say how impressed we have been with the installation of the shed we purchased from Challenge Fencing.  The installation was done to a very high level.  The parts had to be brought in via an alley way to the rear of our mid terrace property and this was negotiated very easily.

Please convey our thanks again to the man who did the installation (unfortunately I do not know his name).

Initial shed viewings at the showroom in Ripley, ordering, delivery day queries and installation – a high class service from start to finish.  We would be happy to recommend your firm to others.  Please feel free to use our comments on your website.

Many thanks again

Jane and Robert Dicken